product positioning analysis

when identifying target market opportunities, a company needs to compare the way its brand is perceived with the needs of the targeted market. a position is the way a company’s brand fits into targeted market segments relative to competitors. ultimately, customers decide how to react to a company’s brand and position relative to others. when conducting positional analysis, the key is to determine what position the company intends to have and how its brand is actually perceived by customer markets.

companies want to target the most profitable potential customers first and follow up with other market segments that offer good opportunities. as outlined in a report titled “positioning analysis: marketing engineering technical note” by decision pro inc., perceptual map is a visual process of mapping the potential connection between what a company and its brand offers relative to what particular market segments want. the map includes an analysis of what your brand intends to offer, what a potential target market needs, and how that target market perceives your brand as a possible option for meeting those needs. this matchup presents the best opportunity for you to market and sell your solutions at a fair value and to a market with good demand. he holds a master of business administration from iowa state university.

third, draw the map by plotting on a graph the position of every product in the market you’ve selected according to its price and its level of primary benefit, and draw a line that runs through the middle of the points. one way to do that is to track the relationship between prices and a product’s key benefit over time. in its simplest form, a price-benefit positioning map shows the relationship between the primary benefit that a product provides to customers and the prices of all the products in a given market. to determine that value, you must first draw up a list of the benefits offered by all the different products or brands in the market and gather data on how customers perceive those benefits. when you have identified the primary benefit, you are ready to draw a positioning map by plotting the position of every company’s product (or brand) in the marketplace according to its price and its level of primary benefit. let me illustrate the process and purposes of drawing a positioning map by returning for a moment to the challenges that motorola faced in launching the razr2. plotting prices against the primary benefit products offer in a market makes it easy to see how that market looks to customers.

that was driven home to me when my colleagues and i conducted an analysis of the u.s. motorcycle market. take the case of a major u.s. hotel chain that in 2000 wanted to know what new restaurants it should open in its new york city hotels, which ones it should reformat, and how it could earn more from them all. that explained 73% of the variation in prices, whereas cuisine accounted for a mere 3.5% and location just 2.5%. auto aficionados will remember that in the mid-1990s, many experts criticized bmw for trying to enter the pricey low-end subsegment of the u.s. market by repositioning the 3 series. for example, the slope of the expected-price line in the midsize-car market declined throughout the 1990s, implying that customers were becoming less willing to pay for a larger platform. more and more people began to use the products, and to use them in additional applications. in 2000, primo moved one of its products down the new expected price line to a low-cost position in the basic segment.

positioning analysis is a process of analyzing how a company’s current brand is perceived by the marketplace. drawn by using simple statistical analysis, a price-benefit positioning map provides it’s best to limit the geographic scope of the analysis if customers, competitors, or the way products are used differ market positioning refers to the ability to influence consumer perception regarding a competitor positioning, product positioning examples, product positioning examples, product positioning strategies, competitive positioning examples, product positioning template.

product positioning is most successful after an analysis of the market and the different sections your conducting a swot analysis is a useful way to objectively analyze what your product is doing well and where it can do identifying, strengthening and improving your position. we use market or positioning analysis to generate information on, positioning strategy example, product positioning framework, positioning statement, market positioning map, attribute positioning, competitive positioning map, current market position, how can a firm develop and establish an effective positioning in the market

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