fighter brand strategy

a fighter brand is designed to protect a premium offering by combating, and ideally eliminating, its cheaper competitors. in such cases—like that of busch beer ( see the sidebar “the one to beat”)—the fighter brand not only eliminates competitors but also opens up a new, lower-end market for the organization to pursue. positioning a fighter brand presents a manager with a dual challenge: you must ensure that it appeals to the price-conscious segment you want to attract while guaranteeing that it falls short for current consumers of your premium brand. call it “un–brand management.” to prevent cannibalization, a company must deliberately lessen the value, appeal, and accessibility of its fighter brand to its premium brand’s target segments. as a blue-chip multinational, it lacked the competencies to win the kind of price war it was entering. archrival amd recognized that intel was not well positioned to serve this growing segment of the market and launched a fighter brand of its own.

overhead, in short, was huge and had to be covered by a brand exclusively focused on the low-price, low-margin small-car business. fighter brand success depends on more than initially matching the price and value of your intended enemy; you must also achieve those goals while attaining a sustainable level of profits. when united launched its fighter brand ted to combat discount airlines frontier and southwest, the skewed orientation of the new brand was evident from the start. though a fighter brand inevitably originates from the recognition of a competitor and the limitations of an organization’s existing premium brand, management’s focus should immediately switch to the consumer segments that the new brand is targeting. it also meant that jetstar entered a market that was still growing—a major consideration for a fighter brand intent on reducing the cannibalization of its premium brand. but the greatest cost of a fighter brand may be its propensity to cause managers to delay essential strategic decisions on their existing portfolio of brands. and the combination of a premium and a value brand in the market allows a company to calibrate those two offerings to its own strategic advantage.

in marketing, a fighter brand (sometimes called a fighting brand or a flanker brand) is a lower-priced offering launched by a company to take on, and ideally take out, specific competitors that are attempting to under-price them. in the case of flankers, or multibranding, the products may be identical to the main offerings and the new brand is used to expand product placement. use of a fighter brand is one of the oldest strategies in branding, tracing its history to cigarette marketing in the 19th century.

[2] as customers trade down to lower-priced offers because of economic constraints, many managers at mid-tier and premium brands are faced with a classic strategic conundrum: should they tackle the threat head-on and reduce existing prices, knowing it will reduce profits and potentially commodify the brand? with both alternatives often equally unpalatable, many companies choose the third option of launching a fighter brand. the celeron microprocessor is a case study of a successful fighter brand. this led to intel’s creation of the celeron brand, a cheaper, less powerful version of intel’s pentium chips, as a fighter brand to serve this market.

the subsequent development and marketing of the product stay focused on its target consumer segment. but the unlike traditional brands that are designed with target consumers in mind, fighter brands are created specifically to combat a competitor that is threatening to take market share away from a company’s main brand. a related concept is the flanker brand, a term often found in the mobile phone industry. a flanker brand (also known as fighter brand) is a new brand introduced into the for example, when qantas launched its flanker brand jetstar, the strategy was to strike back against, fighter brand example, fighter brand example, flanker brand strategy, fighter brand risk, a fighter brand is quizlet. unlike flanker brands or traditional brands that are designed with a set of target consumers in mind, fighter brands are specifically created to combat a competitor that is threatening to steal market share away from a company\’s main brand. fighter brands are usually a classic recession strategy. in marketing, a fighter brand is a lower-priced offering launched by a company to take on, and ideally take out, specific competitors that are attempting to under-price them.

you face a classic strategic conundrum: a fighter brand is designed to combat, and ideally it’s one of the oldest strategies in branding. unlike traditional brands that are designed with a set of target consumers in mind, fighter brands are specifically created to combat low-price competitors that threaten to steal market share away from a company’s premium brand. unlike traditional brands that are designed with target consumers in mind, fighter brands are created specifically to, fighter brand risks, why might a company introduce a fighter brand, fighter brand examples india, new brand strategy

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